Moire Wadleigh Student Prize

Dr. Wadleigh (top) with one of her students onboard the ship El Puma on an oceanographic expedition.
Dr. Wadleigh (top) with one of
her students onboard the ship
El Puma on an oceanographic
expedition.

Moire Anne Wadleigh Student Prize in Stable Isotope Science (pdf)

The Moire Anne Wadleigh Student Prize in Stable Isotope Science is awarded to the student presenting the best paper or poster at the Advances in Stable Isotope Techniques and Applications (ASITA) Conference, as determined by an independent panel of judges convened by the conference organizers.

This prize is given in memory of Professor Moire Anne Wadleigh, a prominent member of the Canadian stable isotope community, and co-organizer of the 2002 Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop at Memorial University.  Dr. Wadleigh contributed an enormous amount to our science in her all too short lifetime.  Her MSc thesis research on strontium isotopes in rivers, conducted at the University of Ottawa, remains the first and critical reference on this topic.  Her PhD research at McMaster on the isotopic behaviour of sulphate in rain, and the environment more generally, was years ahead of its time in helping us to track and understand the movement of these compounds in the atmosphere.  Dr. Wadleigh’s post-doctoral research on the oxygen-isotope composition of ancient oceans, and its implications for Earth’s evolution, remains central to one of geochemistry’s most important controversies.  Likewise, her work as a Research Associate at The University of Western Ontario on fluid-flow in the continental crust provided new ways of understanding these systems.  Her most enduring scientific contributions are her pioneering research conducted at Memorial University from 1991 to 2004, in collaboration with her staff and students.

Professor Wadleigh had a fascination with the behaviour of sulphate and nitrate in the atmosphere.  She studied these compounds in rain, in aerosols, on lichens, wherever they might be had, to understand their origin and their impact on Planet Earth.  At the time of her death, she was actively engaged in the Canadian and International SOLAS projects to determine the connection between ocean uptake of greenhouse gases and natural emissions of sulphur-bearing compounds.  During all of this work, Dr. Wadleigh worked very closely with her graduate students.  She gave them her time and advice without limit, and she gave them room to evolve their own ideas as young scholars.  It is therefore fitting that we honour her memory in this way.

The Moire Anne Wadleigh Student Prize was established and endowed by FJ Longstaffe in 2005, with donations from the 14th Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop, jointly sponsored by the University of Saskatchewan and Environment Canada in Saskatoon in 2008, and the 15th Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop, held at Cornell University in 2009, helping to strengthen the Prize further.

Fred J. Longstaffe
The University of Western Ontario

Previous Winners of the Moire Anne Wadleigh Student Prize in Stable Isotope Science:

2005 – Sam Russell, MSc candidate, The University of Western Ontario, for “Airlock laser fluorination triple oxygen isotope analysis of clays and meteorites. At the 11th Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada, August 14-17, 2005

2006 – Michelle Chartrand, PhD candidate, University of Toronto, for “Stable Carbon Isotope Analysis of a-Hexachlorocyclohexane: potential for source fingerprinting”. At the 12th Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, June 12-14, 2006.

2007 – Tim Jardine, PhD candidate, University of New Brunswick, for “On-line organic hydrogen isotope analysis: anchors, exchangeability and equilibration”.  At the 13th Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop, University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB, Canada, June 24-27, 2007.

2008 – Sam Russell, PhD candidate, The University of Western Ontario, for “Online δ15N, δ18O and δ17O measurements of dissolved nitrate by chemical reduction and catalytic decomposition.”  At the 14th Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada, June 15-18, 2008.

2009 – Ying Zhang, PhD candidate, Cornell University, for “Uniform isotopic standards for gas chromatography combustion isotope ratio mass spectrometry of steroids.”  At the 15th Canadian CF-IRMS Workshop, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA, June 28-July 1, 2009.

2010 – Not Awarded

2011 – Courtney V. Holden, BSc (Honors) candidate, Queen’s University, for “Isotopic analysis of fish otoliths: Insights into the thermal history and stock origin of the American eel (Anguilla rostrata).” At the 17th ASITA (Advances in Stable Isotope Techniques and Applications) Conference, Queen’s University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada, June 12-15, 2011.

2012 – Not Awarded

2013 – Anthony J. Menicucci, PhD candidate, University of California Davis, for “Microfluorination: a new approach for analyzing quartz and biogenic silica δ18O via continuous flow mass spectrometry.” At the 19th ASITA (Advances in Stable Isotope Techniques and Applications) Conference, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, June 02-05, 2013.

2014 – Bobby Walsh, PhD candidate, University of California, Davis, Graduate Group in Ecology, for the oral presentation Rapid, compound-specific δ13C and δ15N analysis of amino acids with chloroformates and the poster “Data from over 100 isotopic studies of amino acid carbon and nitrogen: Emerging patterns and trends”.  At the 20th ASITA (Advances in Stable Isotope Techniques and Applications) Conference, University of California, Davis, USA, June 15 – 18, 2014.

2015 – Chris Spencer, PhD candidate, School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, for the oral presentation Development and Final-Stage Testing of McMaster’s CO2 Clumped Isotope Facility.  At the 21st ASITA (Advances in Stable Isotope Techniques and Applications) Conference, University of Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, June 27 – 30, 2015.